LDL

What is LDL?

Low-density lipoproteins (LDL) are vehicles for transporting cholesterol in the bloodstream. LDL cholesterol is commonly considered “bad" cholesterol because LDL carries cholesterol to the vessels where it can build up in the vessel walls (pro-atherogenic). High LDL levels are thus associated with increased cardiovascular risk.

Why is it included in the Cardiovascular axis?

LDL is routinely used to assess cardiovascular risk and is included in SiPhox Health's base panel. High LDL levels are associated with atherosclerosis, which occurs when plaque builds up along the blood vessel walls, resulting in a heightened risk of health problems such as coronary artery disease or stroke.

How can I better understand my results?

To better interpret your results, Johns Hopkins Medicine has released ranges for LDL:

  • Optimal: < 100 mg/dL
  • Elevated: 100-130 mg/dL
  • Borderline High: 130-160 mg/dL
  • High: 160-190 mg/dL
  • Very High: > 190 mg/dL

If your LDL is elevated, here are some lifestyle changes you can try:

Where can I learn more?

Peter Attia, M.D. - Intro to lipids & lipoproteins: why there is no ‘bad’ or ‘good’ cholesterol

CDC - LDL and HDL Cholesterol: "Bad" and "Good" Cholesterol

National Library of Medicine (Video) - Cholesterol Good and Bad

 

DISCLAIMER: IF YOU ARE CONCERNED WITH ANY OF YOUR RESULTS, PLEASE CONSULT WITH YOUR PHYSICIAN.